Wecome To RVs and OHVs

This blog is all about RVs (recreational vehicles) and OHVs (Off Highway Vehicles), camping, and survival
and how they work together to provide wholesome family fun and great learning opportunities.
Many posts are intended to familiarize novice campers and RVers with RV systems and basic camping and survival
skills. But even experienced RVers and campers will enjoy the anecdotes and may even benefit from a new
perspective. Comments, questions, and suggestions are encouraged.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

UTVs or Side-by-sides

UTV stands for Utililty Task Vehicle.   As the name indicates, they were originally designed for utility work.  They are also known as side-by-sides because of the seating configuration.  The Kawaski Mule and the Yamha Rhino  were two of the first.  They were small 4-wheel drive vehicles, usually equipped with bucket seats and a steering wheel so they drive like a car.  The origihal Mules and Rhinos looked a little like a Jeep or a small pickup truck.  Their potential for sport use was quickly recognized and soon there were models that looked more like a custom Baja racer than a utility vehicle.

They are designed for high performance off road use,  often having as much a 13" of wheel travel to absorb some pretty big bumps.  Driver and passenger are secured by seat belts or harnesses.   3-point harness are the norm but for racing and other high impact activities a better 5-point harness is recommended.  They usually have roll bars and a small cargo bed at the rear.  Most if not all are equipped with 4-wheel drive, giving them a "go anywhere" capability, as long as the road or trail is wide enough for them.  There are many trails designed for dirt bikes and ATVs where UTVs are prohibited.  

Most UTVs carry 2-5 passengers, but some, like the Ranger, can carry up to 6 passengers.  That makes them popular for family outings, especially when you have children too young or other family members who don't ride.  And the cargo space means you have plenty of room to bring along a well-stocked picnic basket and cooler for lunch out on the trail.

There are many optional accessories available to customize UTVs to an owner's individual needs and wants, including off road lights and elaborate sound systems.  You can even purchase body kits that fully enclose the passenger space and add a heater for winter riding.

I've seen a number of  UTVs equipped with snow plows for clearing winter driveways and small parking lots.  And, of course, they are capable of towing any off-road trailer.  The cargo area makes them useful for hauling a variety of things, ranging from a cooler full of your favorite summer beverages to firewood, medical supplies, and tools

UTVs are usually too wide to be driven on regular ATV trails and definitely too big for single track dirt bike trails.  They are very much at home on fire roads and other dirt roads and the  wide puffy tires, together with 4-wheel drive, provide excellent traction in sand,  mud, and snow.

Because of their larger size and more complex design, they are more expensive than dirt bikes or ATVs, but being able to carry 4-6 people may make the "cost per passenger" more within reach.

In some cases UTVs might be modified to be street legal, but most are intended and purchased strictly for off road use.  Off road tires won't last long on pavement and can contribute to dangerous  problems in handling.  This might be mitigated by changing the tires but in doing so you usually sacrifice some the off road capability for better on road manners.

UTVs may offer hard core off road enthusiasts a way to continue to enjoy their sport even after age, illness, or injury prevents them from straddling a dirt bike or ATV.  Riding in the cushy seats of a UTV for many hours is always going to be more comfortable than sitting in the saddle of dirt bike or ATV and the strain on the driver's arms from the steering wheel will be much less than that from  wrestling with handlebars.   The tires, suspension, and body weight absorb a lot of the jarring impact that is transmitted directly to the riders of dirt bikes and ATVs.

UTVs are smooth!

2 comments:

  1. well, i have never listened about this term, UTV. thanks that you teach us something new and amazing. your effort is highly appreciated. have a nice day!!!

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  2. This term UTV is new to me but it is interesting to know about it in detail. Thanks for sharing the information. I look forward to more new types of customized vehicles.

    ReplyDelete